English Български


BULGARIA / WORLD / TRAVEL TIPS


How to plan a vacation using tech
How to plan a vacation using tech

English Български

Recently we`ve decided to plan a trip abroad. I checked the different deals offered by travel agencies and it turned out that I can`t even find one that fully meets our requirements. So now I had to answer that looming question: how to plan a vacation using tech?

Don`t get me wrong – I usually go into this endeavor with great excitement. I prefer to choose how to travel and where to stay, and I don`t like the group sightseeing. But in this case, I had decided to trust an agency, as we would travel for the first time with our baby daughter. I gathered my thoughts and realized that the organization won`t be different than any other time, it would just need more detailed planning.

So, with great pleasure, I dedicated myself to my favorite activity – exploring the many online resources which can help create the perfect vacation. Gathering them in one file, I realized that this information would be extremely useful for anyone who wants to plan their vacation on their own using only tech. That’s why I decided to share all the useful links with you – for cheap airline ticket booking, accommodation, sightseeing planning, and many more. With their help, a little patience and a good research you could give yourself the best trip to any dream place. Good luck!

How to plan a vacation using tech
Planning a route

rome2rio.com

Airline tickets

google.com/flights

skyscanner.com

kiwi.com

momondo.com

hopper.com

opodo.com

swoodoo.com

checkfelix.com

Accommodation

booking.com

agoda.com

hotels.com

airbnb.com

trivago.com

hotelscombined.com

hostelworld.com

couchsurfing.com

Airline tickets and accommodation package deals

expedia.com

kayak.com

priceline.com

Train and bus tickets in Europe

goeuro.com

Rent a car

rentalcars.com

billiger-mietwagen.de

Parking

parkopedia.com

Sightseeing planning

tripadvisor.com

lonelyplanet.com

worldtravelguide.com

foursquare.com

atlasobscura.com

visitacity.com

roughguides.com

Sightseeing planning with a baby or child

babycantravel.com

travelmadmum.com

Trips and tours

getyourguide.com

klook.com

Food

yelp.ie

bonappetour.com

traveling with your baby or toddler
Traveling with your baby or toddler

English Български

You are about to embark on the first vacation with your baby heading to the seaside or the mountain? Or you`ve already survived this circus, but you want to make sure you`re not missing something important? We are here for you sharing a sample list of (almost) all the things to consider when traveling with your baby or toddler. You can change and adapt the list according to your needs. And now, let`s check what you`ll need to pack.

Traveling with your baby or toddler
Clothes
  • T-shirts, underpants, socks
  • Pajamas
  • Tops with short and long sleeves
  • Pants – short and long
  • Dresses, skirts
  • Jackets
  • Slippers
  • Shoes – sandals, sneakers, flip flops
  • Swimwear
  • Hats
  • Sunglasses
  • Beach towels
  • Blankets
Health care
  • Sunscreen lotion
  • Sunburn lotion
  • Umbrella for sun protection
  • Insect repellent
  • Insect bite and sting cream
  • Anti-allergic syrup
  • Dehydration, vomiting, diarrhea and constipation remedies
  • Cough medicine
  • Ear drops
  • Thermometer
  • Fever medicine
  • Fever gel plasters
  • Hydrogen peroxide, rivanol, gauze, patches
  • Scissors, tweezers
  • Medical insurance if traveling abroad (plus a passport)
Food
  • Breastfeeding pump if you are breastfeeding
  • Infant formula and bottles if you are feeding your baby with formula
  • Spring water
  • Cutlery – spoons, forks, dish
  • Dishwashing liquid and sponge
  • Jars with homemade or bought food
Hygiene
  • Kid’s shampoo, soap, shower gel, after bath lotion
  • Toothbrush and toothpaste
  • Hairbrush
  • Wet towels, diapers
  • Hairpin and hairbands
  • Pot, if it’s already in use
  • Bathrobe or towel
Transportation
  • Summer stroller
  • Ergonomic Baby Carrier
  • Baby Walker Belt
Entertainment
  • Toys
  • Beach pail and Shovel
  • Inflatable toys, kiddie pool
  • Drawing sheets, color pen and pencils
  • Children’s books

 

Culinary
Culinary adventures

English Български

They say that the easiest way to get to know another culture is to try the local cuisine specialties. No one has said that it`s the most pleasant. Culinary adventures often hide some not so pleasant surprises.

There are many local traditional dishes all over the world that seem disgusting to the foreigners. Eating baked rat on a stick (plenty of ketchup and mustard required) is not a figment of Terry Pratchett`s imagination, but a typical dish for Vietnam, Thailand and Cambodia. The popular scene from the Indiana Jones trilogy, in which Indy is offered a snake and monkey brain dish, could be replayed nowadays in China.

And there are also people who are willing to explore culinary specialties, in any point of the world they find themselves, rather than stick to the banal, but well tested hamburgers. They will try almost anything. A typical representative of the culinary adventurers is Natacha Du Pont de Bie. She describes her experience in Laos in her book “Ant Egg Soup”. The title is enough to give you a clue of what the author has undergone in the name of the curious book, full of impressions from the extreme culinary art.

Random fact: in 1998 Joe Staton, then a professor at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard, published his infamous article “Tastes like chicken?”. Staton spent a long time researching and proving the thesis that in the end everything tastes like chicken. According to his theory the meat that we eat today comes from a chicken-flavoured animal ancestor, excluding beef, pork and venison. Furthermore, based on evidence for dinosaurs as the ancestors of birds, Tyrannosaurus Rex would most likely also taste like chicken, Staton claims.culinary-adventures-2

However interesting this theory is, let`s get back to the culinary adventures abroad. Examples from the European cuisine have their special place in the most bizarre world delicacies ranking, too. These are the traditional Norwegian dish “rakfisk” (trout, salted and fermented for up to a year and eaten without cooking) and “lutefisk ” (dried cod steeped in lye and served with pork cracklings), not to mention the garden ortolan roast banned in 1999 in France  (garden ortolan  are small, sweet songbirds from the sparrows family).

Traditional Bulgarian cuisine has also some very interesting examples that could shock the ordinary tourist. We`ll list just a few of them like shkembe chroba (broth made from paunch) and cooked lamb’s head, sauerkraut juice and boza (a slightly fermented drink made from wheat or millet).

Sounds yummy, doesn’t it?